Video making was becoming more and more popular with inhabitants of the fairytale forest. Especially after Winnie the Pooh's video “The Winnie Cloud's Flight For Honey” got a million views.

Responding to the growing flow of questions on his Telegram channel, Christopher Robin delivered a lecture on the movie maker (the first one in Hundred Acre Wood!). As part of it, he showed the forest inhabitants a music video composed of photos from his recent oceanic journey.

As the wisest and most responsible resident of the forest, Owl made sure the record isn't lost. The archive of the fairytale forest can boast of rare records on how to use the movie maker and how to create a video with its help.

And below is Owl's Manuscript #1, devoted to the topic of how to add files in movie maker. It contains video clips recorded from the screen of Christopher Robin's MacBook.

1. It's free

First of all, the movie maker is absolutely free to use.

2. Hints

You can find the hint button near every element of the movie maker's interface.

Click it to get a short hint on what the particular element does and how to use it, as well as a link to the relevant article or tutorial video.

3. Adding photos, videos, music, text

While sailing the Pacific Ocean and visiting various islands of Polynesia, I published my photos on Instagram, Facebook, and other social media. But most of my photos were saved on my computer and phone. The movie maker easily uploads photos from any source.

When you add files from different sources, such as your computer and phone, there's no way for the movie maker to understand that you want to use all the newly uploaded files in one and the same video. So, you should register (it's free and easy), so that you can upload your files from one and the same user account.

First of all, I signed in from all devices using my username and password.

I added the photos of my plush friends from social media using the corresponding button in the movie maker. You just need to click on it, go to the Upload Wizard, and authorize access to Facebook or Instagram. Next, choose the album and check the photos you want to add to your fairytale video.

I used the upload button to put the videos and photos from my phone and computer.

Also, I used several fabulously beautiful ocean and forest pictures from a free stock photos collection as the background. And added a groovy music track from the free collection for the inhabitants of our forest.

In this field, I added the subtitles and comments.

After a short break, Christopher continued to explain how to edit and create a video in the movie maker.

Christopher Robin got on the roll; he enjoyed teaching the fairytale animals so much that he created a few more lessons on video making:

  • The animals were unwilling to pay, but, luckily, everything was free
  • How to put and edit images
  • How to add interesting symbols
  • How to put and edit video clips
  • How to merge photos and videos
  • How to add the fade to black